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agc voter guide NEW LAWS ELECTION RESULTS

Contact Brad Barnum, Executive Vice President, for more information at (858) 731-8158.

 

ELECTION RESULTS

November 9, 2016

A National Surprise, a Hit to PLAs, and Infrastructure Wins and Losses

Voters throughout the country sent a clear message about who they want to lead our country...President-Elect Donald Trump. Here in San Diego, voters generally sent clear messages about their candidates, and in most cases, about investing in the region's infrastructure. Let's take a look at the "unofficial" results for some of AGC's endorsed candidates and ballot measures, as there are still 620,000 provisional ballots to be counted.

Candidates

Congress Members Duncan Hunter and Darrell Issa are returning to Washington, DC; although Issa did receive a scare from a well-funded opponent. Denise Gitsham lost by 13+ percentage points to Scott Peters, who didn't have to sweat out a close win as he had done the last two elections.

Business-backed candidate Robert Hickey lost his bid for San Diego City Attorney to Mara Elliott. The City is predominately Democratic, and the labor unions worked hard to get her elected. Another business-backed candidate, Kristin Gaspar, who is running for County Board of Supervisors, is in a close race with incumbent Dave Roberts. However, she is behind 49-51%.

Grossmont-Cuyamaca Community College District

AGC, ABC, WECA, and the Coalition for Fair Employment in Construction went "ALL IN" to get a Governing Board Member elected to the Grossmont-Cuyamaca Community College District, and to defeat Measure X, a $348 million bond that was to have a Project Labor Agreement (PLA) on the construction program if it had passed.

Tim Caruthers is leading the Building Trades Union candidate Elena Adams 51-49%, and Measure X has received only 51.7% of the vote (needs 55%). This was a "key campaign" for labor, as was Measure X. This will be a major victory for the entire construction industry, and it should send a message to school governing boards throughout the County that voters support fair and open competition.

School Bonds

Seven or eight of the other nine local school bond measures are going to pass, as they received over 55% of the vote:

  • Measure MM - $455 Million Bond for Mira Costa Community College District
  • Measure Z - $400 Million Bond for Southwestern Community College District
  • Measure AA - $45 Million Bond for Fallbrook Union High School District
  • Measure BB - $128 Million Bond for Grossmont Union High School District
  • Measure GG - $22 Million Bond for Cardiff School District
  • Measure HH - $30 Million Bond for National School District
  • Measure JJ - $105 Million Bond for Solana Beach School District
  • Measure EE - $20 Million "Ed Tech" Bond for Cajon Valley Union School District (too close to call - currently at 54.9%)

Bonsall Unified School District's Measure DD, a $58 Million Bond, only received 50.79 % of the vote.

City Infrastructure - Chula Vista and Del Mar (wins)

Over 67% of voters in both Chula Vista and Del Mar voted to increase their sales tax by ½ cent to pay for city services and vital infrastructure projects. The tax is permanent in Del Mar, and for 10 years in Chula Vista.

Transportation Infrastructure - Measure A (loss)

Over 57% of San Diego County voters supported investing in the region's transportation infrastructure, but when the requirement to pass Measure A, a ½ cent sales tax to pay for these improvements is a two-thirds vote, everything must go right on the campaign.

It was a winnable campaign, but there were a number of factors that contributed to Measure A's defeat: A new tax; too many other measures on the ballot; opposition from the Republican and Democratic Parties; differences of opinion from various environmental factions; an out of control radio talk show host; and a concerted effort by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW 569) to stick a knife in the other unions' efforts to pass this important measure, killed any hope to reach the two-thirds approval threshold.

Voters rallied around President-Elect Donald Trump's support of fixing this country's infrastructure. Losing Measure A should never have happened. We need to continue to elect other pro-infrastructure candidates, and create effective (not divisive) coalitions to pass important ballot measures.